Noise

The Harvard Advocate, founded in 1866, is the oldest continuously published collegiate literary magazine in the country. Over its long history, it can count T.S. Eliot, Conrad Aiken, and Norman Mailer among its members and e.e. cummings, Jack Kerouac, and Tom Wolfe as contributors to its pages. A quarterly magazine, The Advocate‘s mission is to publish the best art, fiction, poetry, and prose that the Harvard undergraduate community offers. Vol 153, Issue 1 (Winter 2018) of The Harvard Advocate, titled Noise.  
Noise lives a double life. It’s the random fluctuations in the background, where voices and images are born and where they go to die. It is also the car alarm, the lawnmower, the kid crying on a plane where you can’t get away and can’t make it stop. It tends to get between you and whatever you actually want to be hearing. “Noise is unwanted sound,” says the collective voice of Wikipedia’s legion of anonymous editors, speaking from the digital abyss. These pages are home to a silent unwanted uproar. They are dedicated to sights and sounds neglected, to everything that reaches your eyes or ears but still evades notice. This issue of The Harvard Advocate tries to listen. From the Editor’s Note. Lily Scherlis, Harvard Advocate President

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